Follow us...

 

Search News Archives

News Channels

 

New Laboratory Products

Lab News

Research & Case Studies

Microscopy | Image Analysis

Separation Science

Brochures & Literature

Videos

Events | Webinars

 

 

Conferences | Events

AFM-IR used by French researchers to identify best microbes for biofuel production

publication date: Mar 13, 2014
 | 
author/source: Talking Science Limited

Anasys Instruments reports on the publication in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters demonstrating the use of AFM-IR used by French researchers to identify best microbes for biofuel production.

Anasys LogoWhile the debate over using crops for fuel continues, scientists are now reporting a new, fast approach to develop biofuel in a way that doesn't require removing valuable farmland from the food production chain. Their work examining the fuel-producing potential of Streptomyces, a soil bacterium known for making antibiotics, appears in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. The scientists used atomic force microscopy combined with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to measure the size and map the distribution of oil inclusions inside of microorganism without staining or other special sample preparation. The same method also could help researchers identify other microbes that could be novel potential fuel sources.

The authors led by Ariane Deniset-Besseau from the Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique at the Universite Paris-Sud point out that with the rise in oil prices in recent years, the search has been on for alternative fuels. Though plants such as soy and corn have been popular, the honeymoon ended as people realized how much arable land they were taking up. So now, researchers are seeking additional sources, including bacteria. Streptomyces has become a candidate in this search. It can make and store large amounts of oils called triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are direct precursors of biodiesel. Also, manufacturers already know how to grow vast amounts of it because pharmaceutical companies use the versatile bacterium to produce life-saving antibiotics. To better understand these microbes' potential as a fuel source, Deniset-Besseu's team wanted to explore how Streptomyces stores TAGs.

They used a novel laboratory instrument that combines an atomic force microscope with a tunable infrared laser source. This instrument allows researchers to determine how and where the bacteria store TAGs. Some strains hardly accumulate any oil, whereas others stored large amounts of oil in a way that might be easy to harvest. The researchers conclude that their technique could greatly speed up the identification of other microbes that could produce large amounts of bio-oil.


more about AFM-IR


more about Anasys


more news from Anasys



If you have not logged into the website then please enter your details below.



 

 

Popular this Month...

Our Top 10 most popular articles this month

 

Today's Picks...

 

 


 

Looking for a Supplier?

Search by company or by product

 


Company Name:

Product:


 

 

Please note Lab Bulletin does not sell, supply any of the products featured on this website. If you have an enquiry, please use the contact form below the article or company profile and we will send your request to the supplier so that they can contact you directly.

Lab Bulletin is published by newleaf marketing communications ltd

 


Promotions

 

Media Partners