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Save the date - Multi-Dimensional Chromatography at Syngenta on 29th October 2019

publication date: Jul 26, 2019
 | 
author/source: The Chromatographic Society

20190726


A one-day symposium that explores the latest techniques in multi-dimensional chromatography.

Leading specialists from industry and academia will explain how they apply the latest 2-D techniques to achieve very difficult separations in the liquid, supercritical fluid, and gas phases. Instrumentation and consumables will be displayed in a comprehensive supporting exhibition from relevant manufacturers.

 

Invited Lecture Presentations

  • "Development of two-dimensional high-performance liquid-chromatography for the separation and characterisation of therapeutic oligonucleotides and associated manufacturing impurities" - Christina J Vanhinsbergh (Uni Sheffield)
  • “The Investigation of 2D Separation Techniques for the Analysis of Agrochemical Formulations and Co-formulants” - Pablo Navarro (Syngenta, Jealott’s Hill, UK)
  • “2D-LC coupled with radio-detection: applications for chiral agrochemical analysis” - Dr Mark Garrod (Syngenta, Jealott’s Hill, UK)
  • “Lecture Title to be announced” - Jeorg Weber (Syngenta, Münchwilen, Switzerland)
  • “Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography: from small molecules to large particles and from method development to data analysis” - Bob Pirok (Van ‘t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences University of Amsterdam)

Lecturers and Exhibitors will be updated and timings and abstracts added to the programme as they are received.

 

Delegate Admission Prices

  • Member of the Chromatographic Society or one of its affiliated societies (BMSS, ELRIG or RSC) - £150 + VAT = £180
  • Non-member rate - £180 + VAT = £216
  • Bona fide student/Retired rate £75 + VAT = £90

CHROMSOC Industrial and student bursaries are available.

Please note that Syngenta employee scientists are admitted free of charge to lectures and exhibition. The Chromatographic Society thanks Dr David Portwood and Syngenta management for inviting us to run this symposium at their site at Jealott’s Hill. Refreshments will be provided throughout the day for paying delegates, exhibitors and speakers.

 

register here

more about ChromSoc


Sponsorship And Exhibition Costs

  • GOLD LEVEL SPONSORSHIP - £1750 + VAT = £2100
    This includes a table top exhibition stand plus 20 mins lecture time integrated into the programme and 3 free delegate admission places.
  • SILVER LEVEL SPONSORSHIP - £1250 + VAT = £1500
    This includes a table top exhibition stand plus 10 mins lecture time integrated into the programme and 2 free delegate admission places.
  • BRONZE LEVEL SPONSORSHIP - £750 plus VAT = £900
    This includes a table top exhibition stand and 1 free delegate admission place.
  • SPEAKERS & EXHIBITORS:
    To discuss your sponsorship level and/or your lecture content please contact Dr. Chris Bevan.

 


TIMETABLE OF EVENTS FOR 28th & 29TH OCTOBER 2019

 

28th October 2019

From 2pm to 5pm

  • SET UP OF 8 EXHIBITORS TABLES (ROOMS Egret 1&2) & Audio-visual equipment in lecture room at SYNGENTA

 

29th October 2019

9am to 10am

  • Registration desk open: Tea and Coffee available
  • Laboratory tours may be arranged on an ad hoc basis during the day for interested delegates.

10 to 10:15am

  • Introduction and welcome from Syngenta and the Chromatographic Society - David Portwood and Chris Bevan

10:15 to 10:30am

  • “GC2 Made simple - Comprehensive two dimensional GC using a Thermoelectrically cooled modulator-Kathy Ridgway ANATUNE

10:30 to 10:45am

  • “The latest innovations in multidimensional GC software: What can ChromSpace do for you?” - Dr Laura McGregor, Product Marketing Manager, SepSolve Analytical Ltd

10:45 to 11:15am

  • “Development of Two-Dimensional Supercritical Fluid Chromatography for highly polar aqueous samples” - Raymond Wong, Shimadzu

11:15 to 11:30am

  • Coffee & Tea break

11:30 to 12.15pm

  • “Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography: from small molecules to large particles and from method development to data analysis” - Bob Pirok (Van ‘t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences University of Amsterdam)

12:15 to1:00pm

  • "Development of two-dimensional high-performance liquid-chromatography for the separation and characterisation of therapeutic oligonucleotides and associated manufacturing impurities" - Christina J Vanhinsbergh [Uni Sheffield]

1pm to 2:00pm

  • Lunch and Exhibition

2:00 to 2:30pm

  • “2D-LC coupled with radio-detection: applications for chiral agrochemical analysis” - Dr Mark Garrod (Syngenta, Jealott’s Hill, UK)

2:30 to 3.00pm

“Development of a screening method for peak purity assessment by 2D-LC”. - Jeorg Weber (Syngenta, Münchwilen, Switzerland)

3:00 to 3:30pm

  • “The Investigation of 2D Separation Techniques for the Analysis of Agrochemical Formulations and Co-formulants” - Pablo Navarro (Syngenta, Jealott’s Hill, UK)

3:30 to 3:45pm

  • Tea break

3:45 to 4:15

  • “2D-LC in Pharmaceutical R&D. Applications beyond increasing peak capacity” - Adrian Clarke, TRD and CHAD Analytical Network Leader, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland

4:15 to 4:30pm

  • “Novel Applications in Enantioseparations” - Brian Montgomery & Helen Poole HICHROM / VWR International Limited

4:15 to 4:45pm

  • “Title to be announced ” - Federico Del Tongo, Event Manager for UK and Ireland, AGILENT

4:50 to 5pm

  • “Summing Up, Thanks and Farewell”: Chris Bevan

 


EXHIBITING COMPANIES AND LECTURERS

20190726

ABSTRACTS

UPDATED AS RECEIVED

 

Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography: a growing addition to separation science technology.

By Christina Jayne Vanhinsbergh, PhD researcher in 2D-LC, University of Sheffield.

Many industries rely heavily on liquid chromatographic separations for the analysis of molecular products, active pharmaceutical ingredients, reaction components and toxic substances. Improvements in stationary phase chemistry, along with reduction in particle size has helped to increase selectivity and peak capacity dramatically over the past decade. A drawback for many separations, however, is that molecular species analysed today are structurally and physicochemically closely related. This, along with biased separation mechanisms, can lead to co-elution or reduced resolution of analytes.

Multidimensional chromatography couples orthogonal modes of separations to overcome challenging analyses. Orthogonal separations can pre-treat samples, simplify complex
chromatography, as well as resolve co-eluting species. The technique is developing into both comprehensive and selective approaches, suited to the analytical drivers of separation.

Multidimensional liquid chromatography also has the potential for reducing reliance on technologies requiring highly skilled analysts, such as mass spectrometry - as separation of critical species reduces the requirement for targeted mass detection over a peak. In workflows where mass spectrometry is utilised, increases in peak capacity and resolution
can improve quantitative analysis.

Multidimensional liquid chromatography presents challenges to the analyst, which require a detailed understanding of the mobile and stationary phase chemistries, potential analyte. interactions and what factors can detrimentally effect separation (such as miscibility of mobile phases, dilution and sensitivity). The challenges described, indicate that optimisation of the technique must be approached with due diligence to achieve the benefits of peak capacities ranging into the thousands. Multidimensional liquid chromatography could be applied for food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, chemical and environmental analysis. A search for available literature documents evidence of its growing use in aforementioned industries, as is the growing number of chromatographic conferences dedicating presentation space to
researchers in the field.

 

Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography: from small molecules to large particles and from method development to data analysis

By Dr. Bob Pirok (Van ‘t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences University of Amsterdam)

In the MANIAC project, completely different and (seemingly) incompatible separation mechanisms are compared into a single highly efficient and extensively optimized instrument. Hence the name “Making Analytically Incompatible Approaches Compatible”. In MANIAC, various chemical, physical and microbial processes are integrated with (multi-dimensional) separation systems.

Amongst the investigated applications is the characterization of complex polymeric nanoparticles encountered in coating formulations and drug-delivery systems. These complex samples feature a multitude of sample dimensions, such as the particle-size distribution, the surface composition and charge, and the molecular weight and chemical composition of the constituting molecules including its active-ingredient if applicable. A successful technique for the separation of complex mixtures is
comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC).

Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography is indispensable for the separation of complex mixtures. In principle, the development of an LC×LC method requires establishing two separation dimensions with vastly different (“orthogonal”) selectivities. However, with the advent of state-of-the-art instrumentation for LC×LC, the number of options to realize and optimize LC×LC separations is increasing dramatically. Advanced modulation interfaces have significantly reduced the
threats of solvent incompatibility and limited detector sensitivity in the comprehensive mode (LC×LC). However, these developments are accompanied by an increase in the complexity of the system and, thus, the time required for method development.

We recently demonstrated a proof-of-principle MANIAC system, which combined a separation of particles in aqueous hydrodynamic chromatography with a fast separation of the constituting polymers by organic size-exclusion chromatography. The developed method featured a novel implementation of intermediate sample transformation and now has been expanded to allow even hydrophilic and charged particles to be modulated. In addition, we focus on the use of capillary and
chip-based microreactors to improve the applicability and flexibility of the overall potential of LC×LC separations towards drug-delivery particles.
In this presentation, these and other developed methods for large and small molecules will be shown. Moreover, great attention will be given to the feasibility of 2D-LC as a technique in the industrial routine lab. The development and application of method-development and data-analysis tools to facilitate easy and flexible use of 2D-LC will be demonstrated.

 

“2D-LC in Pharmaceutical R&D. Applications beyond increasing peak capacity”

By Adrian Clarke, TRD and CHAD Analytical Network Leader, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland

Conventional liquid chromatography (1D-LC) is not always capable of effectively resolving complex samples. This limitation is not solely due to the lack of column efficiency, but is pre-dominantly due to insufficient chromatography selectivity and the need to separate the analytes of interest by utilising orthogonal retention mechanisms. These limitations are the main reason, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) is continuing to attract much interest for its markedly higher resolving power compared to 1-D separations.

This presentation will discuss the benefits of 2D-LC, and show examples of multiple applications of (multiple heart-cutting) 2D-LC in pharmaceutical analysis. The presentation will demonstrate 2D-LC is not only beneficial to increase peak capacity, but also to support process and product development and investigations. Applications include: tracking of the various peaks of interest across 2 different methods (e.g. method transfer from an MS incompatible buffer to an MS compatible buffer). A second application using 2D-LC-SPE-MS for on-line enrichment of impurities peaks to facilitate improved impurity identification. The third application supports method development by confirming peak purity using orthogonal stationary phases in the 1st and 2nd dimensions and can be was used to investigate mass balance. Further applications demonstrate the use for the analysis complex pharmaceutical molecules and drug delivery systems (e.g. new modalities).

The talk will finish with a summary on the challenges and future outlook for 2D-LC in the regulated pharmaceutical industry.

Registration

The Chromatographic Society, SAS Event & Association Management, The Old George Brewery, Rollestone Street, Salisbury, SP1 1DX, UK. T: +44 (0)1722 339811, F: +44 (0)1722 331313.

register here

more about ChromSoc


 



 

 

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